Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Demo

The Melbourne Air and Space Show will feature a Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Demo on March 30-31, 2019 at Orlando Melbourne International Airport   You can have the rare once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly in this rare warbird and experience what it was like to be a World War II aviator. For more information, please complete the... View Article


The Melbourne Air and Space Show will feature a Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Demo on March 30-31, 2019 at Orlando Melbourne International Airport

 

You can have the rare once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly in this rare warbird and experience what it was like to be a World War II aviator. For more information, please complete the short form below!

 

The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk is an American World War II era ground attack fighter that first flew in 1938. Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the U.S. The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk and the name Kittyhawk from the P-40D and later. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk cutting development time plus enabling a rapid entry into production and operational service. The Warhawk was used by most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in frontline service until the end of the war.

 

The P-40 first saw combat with the British Commonwealth squadrons of the Desert Air Force in the Middle East and North African campaigns, during June 1941. The Royal Air Force was the first to operate Tomahawks in North Africa and they were the first to feature the “shark mouth” logo. Between 1938 and 1944 there were 13,738 P-40’s built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation’s main production facilities at Buffalo, New York. It was the third most-produced American fighter of World War II, after the P-51 and P-47. The P-40 offered the additional advantage of low cost, which kept it in production as a ground-attack aircraft long after it was obsolete as a fighter.

 

The P-40 played a critical role with Allied air forces in three major theaters: North Africa, the Southwest Pacific, and China. It also had a significant role in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe, Alaska and Italy. The P-40 served as an air superiority fighter, bomber escort and fighter-bomber in all of these and performed surprisingly well as an air superiority fighter inflicting a very heavy toll on enemy aircraft. Based on war-time victory claims, over 200 Allied fighter pilots from 7 different nations became aces flying the P-40, with at least 20 double aces mostly in the North Africa, CBI, Pacific and Russian Front theaters.

 

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  1. John says:

    This price is wrongly advertised according to the company that owns the plane. When I asked for an inqury, they responded that a 15 min flight started at $990!!! This is unacceptable and needs to be fixed either by honoring the above $550, or fix the correct pricing.

    • Laney Poye says:

      Hey John, I’ve removed the pricing information above until I can clarify with the plane company. Our apologies, as we are not the same company that runs these flights, so we have to have them let us know when pricing changes occur to update our content! I’ll check in with them and we will get the appropriate price noted. Thanks for making us aware of the situation, and apologies for any frustration that occurred.

      • John says:

        I received an email from the company and the above pricing is correct. It is for a different type of flight offered specifically for airshows.

  2. John says:

    Hi I sent in a request for more information about purchasing a ticket for a flight. When should I expect to see this?

    • Laney Poye says:

      Hi John, can you pop me an email at info@air.show? I’ll connect you directly with the flight team. The flights are handled by a separate company, and due to the arrival of the aircrafts this week, I suspect they probably are simply swamped and missed your email.

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